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league in europe. combined with steadily rising television rights, they have made a solid foundation for german soccer. the only thing missing is that elusive european title. >> we hope they get it. if you are just joining us, you are watching the "journal" coming to you from dw in berlin. after a short break, we will take a look of the role of german chancellor angela merkel in solving the eurozone debt crisis. >> we will be right back. do not go away. >> welcome back. >> 2012 is coming to an end, and a lot of people in europe will be happy to see the old year out. not a day went by without worrying about the future of europe. >> not just for finance experts. a to was also a tough year for political leaders as they lurch from one crisis summit to another, spending -- spending long as wrangling over the best strategy to solve europe cozy financial crisis. >> as europe's biggest economy, germany naturally had a large say. >> as germany's leader, angela merkel naturally made sure her voice was heard. >> she's the most powerful woman in europe. all eyes were on chancellor and to merkel
crushing of eastern europe, 1944-1956." >> why do you open with a quote from churchill? >> he coined the expression iron curtain. it was such an evocative escription of what happened, when he gave the speech that i thought it was important to put that the beginning of the book. >> did you ever think of what he called that the iron curtain? >> there is a long story. it is a theatrical term. there was an iron curtain theaters used to use to prevent fires. churchill used it first in private. >> you know why? >> it was a favor for truman. that is where truman was from. >> let's get a slice of that speech. >> an iron curtain has descended across the continent. behind that line, like all the capitals of the ancient states of central and eastern europe -- berlin, prague, vienna, budapest, belgrade, bucharest. all of these famous cities and the population around them lying lie under the soviet sphere. >> why did you want to talk about this? >> i was inspired in my first book, and while this is in no way a sequel it represents thoughts i had. one thing i got interested in is the questi
and eastern europe -- berlin, prague, vienna, budapest, belgrade, bucharest. all of these famous cities and the population around them lying in rubble -- lie under the soviet sphere. >> why did you want to talk about this? >> i was inspired in my first book, and while this is in no way a sequel it represents thoughts i had. one thing i got interested in is the question why no people went along with it. what is the mentality? what are institutional pressures? why do camp guard do what they are told to do? i decided to write about this period right after world war ii, because it was a time the soviet union had reached a height, there was an apotheosis of stalinism. it was reinforced by the experience of the war. by 1945, it was a fully developed system with an economic theory and a clear ideology, and it was at this moment the red army marched into central europe and began imposing that system on the central european states, so you can see how from scratch -- what did the soviets think their system was? what did they think was important, and how did they try to carry it out? >> where did
in europe are trading lower as ben bernanke warns monetary policy may not be enough to offset the damage if the u.s. economy goes over the fiscal cliff. >>> and the fed takes the new and surprising step in its ongoing efforts to boost the economy, tying interest rates directly to the u.s. unemployment rate. >>> plus, investors cheering the plan to save danone's plans to offset losses over the next two years. >> announcer: you're watching "worldwide exchange," bringing you business news from around the globe. >>> welcome to the program. coming up on today's show, we'll be plenty busy. we head out to tokyo where carry enjoji has been talking about the upcoming elections. then, we hone in on central london where one pilot project is living roof and major buildings. find out what green living can do go r to improve the area. >>> and today, the 1 billionth international tourist will reportedly arrive at a destination in the world. at 11:20 central time, we'll speak to the world travel council to find out why france is still the world's top destination but more money is spent in the u.s. and c
to southern europe. >> and then south korea's presidential election, yes, it's not just japan, and what to expect from the winner. >>> let's just plug you into where we are with this global market. more now on the global trading day in europe. 5-4 advances just about outpace decliners on the dow jones stoxx 600. most european stocks were up yesterday. the dax up 13 points. the dax, second highest close of the year, still up 27.5% for the year. right now, the ftse sound, the cac kron, closed at a fresh 52-week high. and the ftse is up 13 points despite falls from italian banks. let's show you where we are as far as the bond yields are concerned. we just check in. italian yields, 4.4% on the year. we'll show you the twos and tens, as well. i'll give you more on how that compares to where we closed yesterday. so the two-year, that's the low where we were yesterday. 10-year spanish yields, 5.581%. two-year yield, 2.35%, kind of where we were yesterday, too. and they're continue to go appreciateslide slightly from yesterday's close. as far as currency markets, 1.2880 was the two-week low on
in europe of binding disparate economies by means of common currency. this is not the first time these things that happened. it happened in the united states of america. you have disparate economies in the united states of america that are bound together monetarily. missouri and washington state are as different as germany and greece. what is it that keeps the united states together? you had a great depression here in the 1930's. things were awful. and yet, i do not believe there were any political movements to get rid of the deficit states from the united states, like there are in europe and portugal and spain and everywhere else that happens to be in deficit. the reason is, the federal- state, especially after 1929 plays the role of the regulator of surplus and deficit recycling around the land. let me give you a simple example. we are in seattle. boeing is sponsoring the lectures. when boeing goes to washington to give a contract for the next generation jet or whatever, they may get it. they do get it. but there are some things attached. like for instance, we want a factory t
. >> europe says one watchdog is enough to keep its biggest banks from ever collapsing and threatening the euro again. >> the european union leaders held an agreement that would tend banking supervision away from national governments and park -- would take banking supervision away from national governments. >> if the bank -- does need a bailout, all of europe will help foot the bill. >> the deal came after a prolonged deadlock over the details of the proposal. the german chancellor was full of praise for the outcome. but it's a good sign that the finance ministers agreed on a banking supervisor. it is a big step towards greater confidence and trust in the eurozone. >> countries like france and italy have pat -- have pushed for a speedy resolution. banking supervision paves the way for a direct supervision -- direct injection into ailing banks. >> it is no longer the sole responsibility of the member states. rather, all of europe will step in. >> but president hollande did not get everything on his wish list. germany insisted that smaller banks, which make up a large part of its banking
's take a look at how markets are trading. stoxx europe 600 is down about .6% this morning, this after word that house speaker john boehner's plan b didn't come to a vote last night. he couldn't get them in place apparently. we'll have plenty more on the impact of that on the program. not much here, we see decliners well outpacing advancers. the ftse mib in italy down .6%. the ibex down .4%. the dax selling off .5% lower than yesterday. same goes for the ft. if it is, down .8%. 5909. how quickly we've gone from talking about 6,000 to talking about 5,900. the german bund rallying. same goes for the uk. we're seeing a rotation into safety, out of risk and out of spain and italy. about 4.5% for italy. thin trading in markets is exacerbating the move that we're seeing as we approach the year. today, the austy dollar is weaker against the u.s. dollar by about .4%. proxy there for global growth prospects. the dollar/yen is weaker by about .25%. this as markets digest the news out of the boj and gauge whether they'll be successful in boosting inflation ultimately. the euro/dollar, 1.3221. so
. europe right now is the safe haven. there's no negative news. by any means, they are not done with all that's going on over there. everything is focused here on the u.s. and the fiscal cliff, and until that is resolved, if it gets resolved, the traders are pulling back, volatility's high, and there's going to be very thin volume in the markets. it's not going to take much to get gold and silver back up. >> well, back to cindy quickly. if we have a deal, is it bullish for oil? she's already gone. i'll ask doreen, you're with us, aren't you? >> i am. volume, today, by the way, 37% below the three month average. could lead to some volatility, but we have not seen that, have we? >> we have not, but vix is up at 19, a little bit higher. the hope is to get more volume here, otherwise, you know, the fiscal cliff is killing everything. everything. these guys don't get it in washington. i don't know why. i hope they come to their senses soon. ashley: nobody knows why, but i'm tired of saying "fiscal cliff," i know that. thank you so much for joining us. >> thank you. >> and cindy who ran off. t
regimes in eastern europe. under the iron grip, hundreds of thousands died, and many more dissidents were sent to prison camps. these days, as albania tries to show a new democratic base to the world, even hoping one day to become a member of the european union, the past is still there to haunt it. former political prisoners are fighting a bitter battle for compensation, but not even hunger strikes seem likely to convince the current government. >> we go to the site of the hunger strike. the word "democracy" is still written on the wall. strikers refused food for weeks, and then police came and took away their water and medicine. this is where one strikers set himself on fire. the man did not survive. he was recently buried. >> the hunger strike was the result of 21 years of humiliation and discrimination of former political prisoners in this country. we are walking corpses. our bodies are alive, but our spirits have died. >> all their energy goes into the fight. many are mental rex, dependent on drugs or alcohol -- many are mental wrecks. the solidarity within the group is all they have
20 years. so look, and a lot of this is down to problems, i guess, in europe, right? what is the outlook with what happens with global growth and what is happening? >> unsurprisingly, the volume of growth of trade are strongly correlated to the volume of growth. so growth slows down. trade slows down with a sort of multiple. that's the main reason. there may be other marginal reasons like, for instance, difficulties in trade finance. which is a sort of the aftermath of the financial crisis. but the reality is that the main export market of the senate, which is europe, is not doing well. the second export market is not doing that well. not to talk about japan. so this has a slowdown effect which reverb rates on the growth of emerging countries. >> and i know when you see what's happening in italy, will this, the political developments in italy that cause more instability and less reform there, are you concerned that will have a further destabilization impact? >> no. i mean, i think it comes at a time where we are starting to see an exit, a crisis exist by europe. whether th
ago here as opposed to the countries of western europe, we were the most egalitarian of countries. now we are the least. we have outstripped everybody else because our capitalism has been a relatively robust. when capitalism can do it's thing, it polarizes. when it polarizes it creates an awareness that is probably also occur to you. if a growing number of people i'm having a hard time and a shrinking number of people are collecting enormous wealth, it will occur to the two of them that this is happening. and in the one group there may develop their resentment against the of a group. and if you have a system like capitalism coexisting cannot that you have to, but if you have a system of capitalism coexisting with the democratic society in which everybody has the throne and the following in sight is going to occur to a lot of people. we, the majority, are really getting screwed in the economy. the way to fix it to reverse it, to offset is to use the political system to get the result. in the political system weekend rearranged so that what we lost in the economics as it became more and
on the fiscal cliff. equities falling on wednesday in the u.s. on thursday when we opened here in europe, yesterday we saw a relatively stable markets. we closed out on a flat to slightly higher note for most of our european markets yesterday. this morning coming into trade, we're pretty flat. we've taken a bit of a dropdown on this drop but we're just a couple of points lower. in the asian session overnight, we managed to see gains back again. they lost again on the notion of the fiscal cliff not happening. shanghai composite higher by just over 1% in today's session. hang seng, and the kospi closing slightly higher across the board. the european markets mixed, but the ftse 100 still flat to higher. we're all looking towards these fiscal cliff negotiations. at the moment, we've got a couple more days of trade before we get to the end of the new year, as well. most analysts out there, they've been saying we're going to see a relatively flattish end to the year from where we are now given that we've seen such an increase of equities in the past 12 months. we've seen stellar outperformance
eastern europe? anything? >> one of the things that happened since 1989 is the region we used to call eastern europe has become very differentiated. these countries no longer have anything in common with one another, except a common memory of communist occupation. poland is as different as greece is from some land. europe is now divided in many ways to -. there are a few elements of the communist past you can see. there is a paranoid element in politics that comes from the legacy of people being spied on and having lived in an oppressive system. they are more paranoid about secret deals behind their backs, because secret deals were done behind their backs, and that is understandable. there is an anxiety about being left behind in the west. the memory of the past continues to play out, but in truth, these countries are more different from one another than they are similar. >> you through -- you chose three of eight countries behind the iron curtain? >> it depends on how you count. >> what were the three democrats i chose to poland, hungary, and east germany. they have different histori
the way to europe. the destination norway. it's not for eating. it's being made into sake in the same traditional way it's been brewed in japan for centuries. >> reporter: in the norweigan capital, sake is getting popular. many people like to drink with their meals. >> translator: this is made in norway using japanese rice. it's really good. >> reporter: the flavor is tr fruity with a slight acidity. >> translator: i'm very proud of the sake made in norway. >> translator: i usually drink red wine but i love sake too. >> reporter: as europe acquires a growi ining taste for japanes food, demand for sake is increasing. europe's first and only sake brewery is here in the south of norway. it was set up two years ago by a local beer company. the brewer is from canada. he first discovered sake nine years ago and was amazed a complex flavor could be made from rice and water. three years ago he met the owner of this brewery at a sake workshop and was invited to norway to help start a production. >> it's very rewarding. >> reporter: it's brewed in the yamahi style. it produces a more complex, y
happy about what is happening in europe. german stocks are soaring. is it too late to get in? > > we saw the dax push up to a 52-week high last week. really the key here is safety. they are using that stock market as their safety gauge if they are trading over in europe. so, if the safety play continues to warrant being ultra- conservative, yeah, you are going to see that market continue to move upward. if traders want to take on a little bit more risk and spread to some of the other european sovereign-debt nations like spain or greece, then you are probably going to see that safety play back off a little bit. > there are always places to park money. good to have you on the show this morning. have a great trading day. > > you too. if you're not yet fully awake this monday, here's one thing to open your eyes: after years of higher and higher coffee prices to consumers, brazil, which produces a third of the world's coffee, may turn prices around. a record crop there last year is being followed by another bumper crop. our cover story takes a look at what it means for coffee futures and reta
-english-speaking immigrants-- some from europe, some from asia, buworking-class ople. and the landscape we see belows sis landscape of small houses, and the houses are very sie. and the landscape narrator most of the immigrant communities are cad which s siof nghoo thatrelmost concealed beneath the urban forest narrator: it is here in this greener, more affluent part of the city where the new asian elites have chosen to live. ma os ies are children of hong ko businessmen. their parents continue tol ma os ies in the asian omanufacturing industry. theyften commute between vancouver and hong kong. they believe the best way to preserve their wealth is to invest in real estate, and the best way for their investments appreciate is to replace older anglo-canadian housesike these with newer, larger asian-style houses like these. as developers rush to accommodate these new arrivals, ey a teariown exisng homes. ma west side residents have become concerned byhehang they see igorer w lng around them. liss i knew ts house well, because i used to play across the street from it, anit had beautiful timbe inside and oa
and spain. >> how different is it outside of europe in the wider arab world, the middle east? >> they are more accepted outside of europe because europe is a shocking and islamic bloc because there's a need to find a european identity, especially now in the crisis. >> where do you see this going? do you see the creation of a broader european islamic bloc? >> islam house oe been adapted to its cultural surroundings and we can see european islam coming up in a lot of centers in europe. >> his specialist in the dialogue between the islamic world and the west, thank you. onto soccer now. dortmund with another victory under their belts helping the reigning champions close in on the league leaders. their season has been punctuated by ups and downs, but on sunday and, they notched up another important victory in their title defense. >> warring on from the touch line, the caretaker urging his to stay compact. breached by mario. still, he did not play. fearing relegation. moments later, sven scoring a deserved equalizer. in the second half, again with the breakthrough gift. and the ea
, the financial crisis in europe is providing an opportunity for china. earlier this year, we heard from new york times reporter liz alderman on a chinese shipping company that is making waves in greece. > > how successful has this shipping company, known as cosco, been so far in greece? > > it's an interesting story. this chinese basically state- run shipping company came in here about three years ago in a $500 million deal that ever since then has been a model for the country, because what they did is they bought half of piraeus port, which is an ancient port in greece and one of the most important ports in the southern mediterranean. what they did was they basically took an operation that had been effectively lagging under greek ownership and completely turned it around. > > have the the greek people been welcoming of this? the chinese work way is much different from the european way, let's say. > > the chinese have an extremely efficient working practice. as one spokesman there put it to me, they basically run their business by showing that they work 24/7, that has actually rung alarm bells,
in seven months. although shanghai again trades lower even europe's pmi improves a touch in november. first up, we're one month away from the fiscal cliff and so far the white house and congressional republicans are still in disagreement over how to reduce the deficit and avoid a raft of tax hikes and spending cuts. yesterday our own jim cramer and maria bartiromo were on "meet the press" and cramer had a message for fellow panelists and father of the anti-tax pledge, grover norquist. >> most ceos are republican. they're on board. they're not on board with you. they're not on board with you because they fear your view. they think you do not favor going -- you favor going over the cliff. that's what they think. they think that you favor -- >> just for the record since we're on tv. that's silly if they think that they shouldn't be ceos. >> it doesn't really matter. that's what they think. >> i want you to walk me up to that moment. >> behind the record. i like that too. >> i'm stuck. like grover is stuck with this pledge he made everybody take which is that they have to go over the cliff beca
's what is scary. the backdrop of the presidential year was europe. we know where this path leads. all this turmoil, the huge welfare and the low productivity and high unemployment that comes along with them, that was the backdrop of the presidential campaign. voters voted, and they said, yes, we are going to keep moving in that direction, kim. where do you think the electorat is here? is it be ibd hue the choices that -- is it behind the choices that jason suggested they might be? >> barack obamaus won this election by very effectively making this a referendum about his opponent, mitt romney. if you went out and asked most americans, do you think barack obama did a great job in his first term? do you want significantly higher taxes? do you want the government to do nothing about spending? are you happy with obama care? most would say no. but in the end the choice was between a president who said things aren't great, but i'm going to still try to make them better, and a guy who he painted as not having a plan and not identifying with the average wants and needs of most middle class ame
let between innovators coming from central europe and those coming from the plateau which has fostered a suspicious negotiation and character they can see right of into the politics in bucharest to this day and i can go to every country, not every but many countries and talk about but. >> talk for a moment about germany. one of the images germany has natural boundaries to the north and south with the alps and further burden the east and the west is flat plains, so germany had a war over the century with germany or france or that area and poland and because germany was a continental power sandwiched between the maritime europe on one hand and the heartland towards the other it was always problematic which we it would go and how it would develop. i can across this book by accident in early 1989. the berlin fall with -- berlin wall would fall but november. it had occurred to me after reading this book and other books that the berlin wall or the dividing line between eastern and western germany was one. creation of german history that would reinvested soften different territory always in t
turn away from democracy as eastern europe did 50 years ago? i talked to pulitzer prize winning historian anne happalbaum. >>> the administration had a choice save chrysler by injecting taxpayer dollars or let it fail and let it lose perhaps a million jobs. car czar steve ratner gives us a fascinating inside look. for viewers in the united states, we have a special tonight at 8:00 and 11:00 p.m. eastern and pacific called "tough decisions." >>> but, first, here's my take. announcing that he would send proposals on reducing gun violence in america to congress, president obama this week mentioned a number of sensible gun control measures. but he also paid homage to the conventional washington wisdom from mental health issues to school safety. his spokesman jay carney said earlier this is a complex problem that will require complex solution. gun control carney from the only answer. let me respectfully disagree. the problem is not complex and the solution is blindingly obvious. there are three sets of causes that people point to when talking about events like the one in newtown. fir
politics and compromise. everyone knew about the growth. just like in europe. means it could be, in fact, reduced dramatically. fewer jobs, larger deficit. not smaller. and the federal reserve that's throwing up its hands, can't do anything. as i said last night, it doesn't matter. we can pick our stocks and buy them down. like the fabulous names, amazon, ulta salons. buy them down in scales like i outline in the book "real money." now suggesting other groups giving you a bang for the buck. new groups betting that the hope will be squeezed out and the bottom gets put in before a deal is made -- or not. why not? we know the auto market is for 11 years now and we have been sweet on ford domestically. before sandy. where are we internationally? europe. what are some of the other key area, though? i think latin america, though. i think it's coming back. asia already turned. here's the new piece of data. i think europe could be stablized. ford is the one to watch. you get that thing at 11 or blow. i'm out blessing it. haven't done that in a while. in europe i'm thinking that i'm sanguine. exc
for the economy. and the transaction tax is being taken very seriously in europe and probably will happen there, even though the u.k. is kicking and screaming because they specialize in being the home of trading, whether trading in stocks or derivatives or anything else. they simply do not want that to be taxed. there are people in congress. i think wall street is now the number-one contributor to political campaigns. at least, it is in the running for number-one. i have been to washington many times and i'm involved with several groups that are trying to reform the business sector so that it can work, so that it can survive. it is very difficult because of the sheer amount of money that the finance sector in particular is pouring into lobbying and campaign contributions. it is very difficult. >> let's give a round of applause for lin. -- lynn. [applause] there is an opportunity for you to purchase and have the but signed. if you have court-further questions, she will be here signing books. thank you all and have a safe trip home. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [caption
that they're seeing in europe enough to keep them above the pencil line. >> what we've seen so far with today's numbers is exports are declining very sharp. they'll need asia and the u.s. to offset some of that demand weakness, but again, the biggest market for most is the euro zone. if the eurozone is performing badly, that will have a thok-on effect for those countries. >> there's a number of strategists saying after the u.s. has sort of led equities for most of the year, they're now saying europe is the place to be. from i think really the question you have to ask yourself is when cash, equities, credit, government bonds, where do you want to be. and equity in my mind mind is absolutely not. you need good growth numbers to justify the equity markets going up. now, i think there's a lot of investors looking at the yields on ghoechlt bonds or credits and that's motivating them to move into equity. i think the numbers are actually going to be relatively small. and i would certainly advocate against doing that because as you were saying, weak numbers, unless you see some much strong
previously thought, although the session still looks very much on course for another quarter here for europe. the pmi will rise above 50 that divides growth between contraction. hasn't stopped the euro/dollar from hitting a one and a half month high. i suppose we know growth is going to be anemic, but if spanish banks are getting some money, are we feeling slightly better? >> that's what euro trades on, isn't it? pmis are all very interesting for the economist. but they want bigger stories. most of the news flow, it's helpful to the euro. people have been trying to affect this rally for a while. we are close to those october highs. the news flow has been good, i would say. >> we hit, what, nearly 131.80? >> before that, we go 131.40. the enthusiasm for euro is surprisingly good. we're surprised by how far this rally has gone on pretty thin news sometimes. >> i just want to recap what we've got. eurozone finance ministers meeting in brussels. an agreement still seems pretty elusive at this moment. germany and french finance ministers have very different views about oversight of banks. and in
't accurate because of the things in europe or something involved with the election. in other words, other than those shorting or going long stocks ahead of the quarter, these earnings reports need a context to make you money. they can't be relied upon any more because they aren't as predictive of future behavior as they once were. they are a piece of the puzzle. a part of the mosaic. but they are only one of many important parts of what predicts where our stock will go over the intermediate term. and that tends to be the focus that i teach on the show. it is a teaching show because i want you to know the metrics i'm using to pick stocks i talk about and recommend here. and with my travel trust which you can follow along. i also want to teach you how to listen to these conference calls, listen to the transcripts. at least give economy opini-- g you my opinion and what i think matter. i hope this show once and for all -- because this is what i see on twitter constantly -- use earnings season as a way to evaluate your portfolio, what to trim, what you need more of. hone your way of thinking.
next month. tech stocks fall in europe after ericsson unveils a swedish crown writout related to its loss chip venture. >>> reports say the intercontinental call is in talks to buy euro next. >>> and vows to continue the current government's battle against japanese territorial claims. >>> japan's central bank has decided to extend its asset purchase program to $120 billion. it will review the bank's stance on price stability next month. abe has been putting pressure on the boj to raise its inflation target to 2% as part of efforts to fight deflation. for more on the fallout or the impact here, let's talk to luca from asia pacific. you look like you're in mourning here, but it sounds like the bank of japan has delivered pretty much what the market was looking for the. >> yes. it was delivered in order to be seen as losing independence after the campaign, very aggressive campaign from the ldp party on the bank of japan independence. actually, what -- the only policy they didn't really try, according to ldp, was being extremely aggressive, not as -- or much more aggressive than what the
. europe has also been a blend of red and green as the ft names ecb chief the person of the year. we're going to kick off with breaking news. for that would, we go to david faber. >> news on best buy, in the news yesterday. the stock up sharply. what we can tell you right now is the board of directors of best buy, and its founder, richard schultz, has been trying to put together a group to essentially buy the company in a go private transaction, have extended the deadline in which he would need to come with a bid for best buy and created a window in fact that will begin on february 1st next year and end with the end of that month on february the 28th. giving schultz the opportunity to look at not just christmas sales, but the end of their fiscal year, which will end at best buy on the 31st of january. and that window, again, will be 28 days long giving him an opportunity to continue to try to cobble together a bid with private equity firms and those who might finance a potential bid for the company at whatever price that might come at, if it were in fact to come at all. no word in te
been a resurgence of developed markets, europe particularly, and investors who left that market, that's been a great place to be for the last few months. there's so much focus on fiscal cliff. i think that's very hard to do on a day to day basis. for multiasset portfolios, the rest of the world is a good story right now. >> because we're so dominated by these issues in washington. rick santelli, some enthusiasm going on in these markets today with the anticipation of perhaps a deal. do you buy into it? is that what you're seeing in chicago? >> first of all, there are many expecting a deal. down in chicago, we don't just hope for a deal, we hope for a reform-oriented deal. to just do a deal without tagging it to reform is just going to make more of the same at some future date. the treasury complex really, really unfazed by just about all of it. briefly, we're under a 158 yield. haven't been there since second week in november. after 815, 118,000 jobs, interest rates were never as high as they were before that number. that really set part of the stage for treasuries. >> and you guys do
, more green than red on the board today. by three to two, gainers outpacing losers. now, europe was closed yesterday. there was trading in the u.s. it was a weaker session. that move did extend to some parts of asia overnight. interestingly enough, the shanghai composite down .6%. the hang seng was higher on the day. the nikkei adding .9%. the kospi was up even though south korea growth projections were lowered. european markets as we look across the major bourses give you a sense of the action we're seeing in the xetra dax which is about to have its best year in seven years, something like that. the ibex 35 is rallying as we get a further sense of how little value bon can i a has. the ftse mib is moving higher, too, adding about .1%. take a quick look at the bond space, the yield for spain and italy is moving higher today. but roughly as relevance we've seen predominating over the last couple of weeks. that is around 5.3% for spain. 4.5% for italy. we did see guilds moving about 3% level. now back below 1.9%. stick around because straight ahead, we get a view from one economist
in the overall market because of europe or something involved in the election. in other words, other than for those who are shorting or going long stocks ahead of the quarter, these earnings reports need a context to make you money. they can't be relied upon anymore because they aren't as predictive of future behavior as they once were. they are a piece of the puzzle. a part of the mosaic. but they are only one of many important parts that predicts where a stock will go over the interyacht term. that tends to be the focus that i teach on the show. and it is a teaching show. because i want you to know the metrics i'm using to pick stocks i talk about and recommend here. and pick for my charitable trust, i want to teach how you to listen to these calls and read the transcripts. i'm hoping this show will once and for all, because this is what i see at jim cramer on twitter constantly tell you how to evaluate your portfolio, figure out what you need to trim, what you need more of. let it help your stock selection hone your wave thinking. not mine. yours. earnings season
in europe, that still, you know, is simmering beneath the surface. >> rose: we conclude this evening with matt damon and john krakinski, two of the actors in gus van sant's new movie, "promised land". >> the biggest conversation matt and i can have is it starts conversation, beyond the issue of grabbing in the vernacular right now, to us it is the decision of communities gathering together and realizing that they have a voice and a responsibility to sort of unite and engage in these issues that are happening each day and deciding for themselves whether they want it. >> i forgot what it was like to start from, you know, the open laptop and that was just really fun, i just, my wife said to me in the middle of the whole thing, she says no matter what happens if you never make this movie, i haven't seen you this happy, at least remember how much fun it is to write. >> rose: a look at the economy and a look at the movies when we continue. funding for charlie rose was provided by the captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie
and india where there's a big social agenda, you have a different form. anyone europe, southern europe, northern europe, different forms, but in northern europe, the informed capitalism, where the government believes in strong social safety net, believes in paying for health care, believes in playing a role in determining what businesses grow or fail, and they're creating more jobs than we are. so we have to be careful when we, as we sometimes do in the united states, get up on our high horse and say we understand capitalism. actually what's going on in the world is a competition between different versions, and if our version produces more inequality, produces less growth, it's -- is seen as less fair and others are seep as more fair and producing growth, who do you think is going to win that arguement? >> host: a lot of people say the northern european countries, norway, sweden, et cetera, is socialists. is socialism a term that is outdated? >> guest: i think it is. let's take an example. car companies going bankrupt during the last cycle. america, big capitalist country, doesn't have
to slow down and they likely will because europe their biggest customer goes into a full-blown recession if not worse, that is going to spell trouble for the global economy, people won't be needing energy and just like we saw in 2008 with the financial crisis, oil gets hit, the prices get hit in that environment, like you said, though, it i a coter cyclical so it is stimulative to the economy, more money in consumers products hopefully to buy and sustain the economy. >> complicated equation there, john, thanks a lot for coming and explaining all of this, have a great weekend. >> >> still hot on this friday night, u.s. manufacturing staying afloat, the luxury boat business made right here in the usa. >> it is called pay as you earn, it is a new obama administration program to pay off student loans, the starting date to sign up is next friday. but it looks like the plan favors graduate students who get bigger paychecks than low earning workers. >> in the state of >> reporter: in his state of the union address almost a year ago, the president announced a change to the way some people pay ba
you very much. a key session in japan overnight. >>> as we pivot our focus to europe, you see stocks addi adding .3%. consistent with the rally we've seen over the last several trading sessions and apparently having plenty to do with the possible resolution of u.s. fiscal talks. we'll have more in a little bit. the survey also helping to lift sentiment or keep it buoyant. look at the major borses. green in the harder hit regions. ftse mib, spain up better than 1%. consistent with the rally we saw yesterday. remarkable. the xetra dax adding .1%. for its part, up to close to 30% this year. the ftse 100 adding .3. the bond space, we'll look at that and talk later about the big trades that have helped some hedge funds, for example, when it comes to greek debt. for the time being, mario's comments this summer is have techively kept the bond gleelds a tight range since then six months or so now, this is going. and differentiation across the space where italy price rising, not the case for spain which is seeing its yield up to 5.3. and i know we haven't mentioned this in a while, but i want
in yesterday's rally. we didn't get housing starts, that's earlier today. as for the picture in europe, really the stand outout here is the euro. greece getting a five notch upgrade at the s&p. our road map this morning starts with gm. government motors no more. the treasury to exit its stake in the next 12 to 18 months, purchasing 2 million shares by the end of this month. >> another challenging quarter for fedex with the blame squarely on sandy. but the stock is up pre-market. >> oracle posts a strong quarter with even stronger guidance. the season rebound in europe. no impact from the fiscal cliff. >> and ge gets boosted from ubs's key call list on the weaker than expected macro environment. still on the list is including -- well tell you in a couple of minutes. >> general motors is up sharply in the pre-market session. the treasury department says it intends to sell the rest of its stakes in gm in the next 12 to 15 months. the automaker will buy back 200 million shares from treasury for $27.50 a share. treasury says it plans to sell its other remaining shares through various means in an or
movement in europe. capitalism has always been recycling. the process of described is a process whereby the entrepreneur is now forced to be an entrepreneur. the ex-peasants, they did not choose to be entrepreneurs. they had to be. they used debt. bringing it to the present, energizing the production process, producing the wealth from which he hopes that he will be able to repay the debt. the moneylenders, later the bankers. cover for the fact that he had paid wages for capital goods. hoping there is something left for him, for profit. debt is all about intertemporal recycling. by effectively taking his hand and pushing it into the future, grabbing value that had not been generated. -- that is debt. producing the wealth, from which they hoped they would pay the debt. moneylenders, bankers. covering the fact that he had already paid wages, hoping that there would be something less for -- left for him. the fact that there is recycling -- you take a value for the future, bring it into the present, so as to develop -- delivered the body to the future. the problem with this process is once y
. the number of people planning to visit europe rose nearly 14%. the number of domestic travelers also increased by 1.3%. trips to the tokyo area are expected to rise nearly 2%. the capital's new landmark, tokyo's sky tree tower and the renovated tokyo station are expected to be tourist spots. >>> judges on the tokyo district court ruled the government must pay compensation for worker who is suffer health problems due to exposure to asbestos. the plaintiffs claim the workers inhaled asbestos at building sites causing them to develop lung cancer and other illnesses. the presiding judge said the government didn't do enough to protect workers for the risks posed by asbestos. he said it should have ordered contractors to ensure workers more dusk masks and impose a penalty for violations. the court ordered the government to pay $13 million in damages to 170 former workers for their bereaved families. in all more than 600 plaintiffs across joop japan have filed lawsuits against the government, claiming damages for asbestos. the japanese government outlawed asbestos in principle in 1975, but
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